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We thought we’d take a look at the original advertisement campaigns of some of the brands we sell. Our conclusion: PUH-LEASE bring back retro advertising!

We’re not focussing on Big Labels here at le freddie, but we do like our classics. From vintage Dior to old school Naf Naf – we’re trying to offer you the coolest brands of the past, that are still fab today. Here’s an overview of what we have in store.

Vintage Naf Naf

Naf Naf was launched in 1973, when two brothers opened a store in Paris, called ‘Influence’ (how visionary of them). Their own brand Naf Naf was established with the creation of their combi suit (the red one, above left) in 1983. This suit came in every colour of the rainbow, and was sold out in weeks. Please note in your fashion diaries: le freddie wil sell TWO of these suits in the next drop. Please subscribe to our newsletter to be warned when exactly that will be.

In the nineties, Naf Naf went into the denim business – also a big hit in minutes. In the new millennium, Naf Naf lost its edge – it became a highstreet chain selling everything from dresses to underwear, but without the focus it had in the early years. Our advice when shopping for Naf Naf: stick to the eighties and nineties pieces: they’re the best.

Vintage Laura Ashley

As we’re sure you know by now: we’re HUGE Laura Ashley fans. Blame it on the prairie. Here’s some history: Laura Ashley was born in Wales in 1925. She started her design career making furnishing materials (curtains etc) but when she expanded to clothing in the 1960’s, she became a household name. She was obsessed with 19th century England – the romantic era – and decided to design dresses that reflected this period. Natural fabrics, flowery patterns and lots of romantic details: she really is the Queen of Prairie Dresses.

In the eighties, her designs lost some of the romantic touches and became more minimal – although she never really let go of the puff sleeves and bows.

Laura died in 1985, after falling down the stairs in her daughter’s home in Coventry. Her offspring is still actively involved in the Laura Ashley Foundation, an organisation set up to support new talent.

Vintage Levi’s

Levi’s needs no introduction. The brand launched in 1853 in San Francisco and never lost its charm. We love the denim, obviously, but when looking at this late eighties campaign, we realised that their non-denim apparel is fab too. We want more of that!

Vintage Gunne Sax

One of the lesser known brands but BIG with vintage fashion connoisseurs, Gunne Sax is one of our personal fave’s. The brand, founded in 1967 in San Francisco, specialised in ‘formal wear’. That means evening dresses, prom dresses and the likes. The label is named after the ‘gunny sack’ trim on many Edwardian-period dresses. A gunny sack trim is a burlap decoration stitched on dresses and blouses (this little snippet of trivia might make you win at Trivial Pursuit one day!).

Jessica McClintock closed her fashion empire in the late nineties, after the demand for evening dresses declined. The brand is discontinued to this day, making Gunne Sax dresses rare AND wanted finds on the vintage market.

The rest of the best

Also on lefreddie.com: vintage Ungaro (launched in 1973), vintage Kenzo (founded in 1970) and vintage Mugler (founded in 1973). And more brands are coming – so stay tuned!

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